Collapse of Tacoma Narrow Bridge

Watch the amazing “Gallopin’ Gertie” November 7, 1940 film clip.
1940 Tacoma Narrows Bridge.

Slender, elegant and graceful, the Tacoma Narrows Bridge stretched like a steel ribbon across Puget Sound in 1940. The third longest suspension span in the world opened on July 1st. Only four months later, the great span’s short life ended in disaster. “Galloping Gertie,” collapsed in a windstorm on November 7,1940.

The bridge became famous as “the most dramatic failure in bridge engineering history.” Now, it’s also “one of the world’s largest man-made reefs.” The sunken remains of Galloping Gertie were placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1992 to protect her from salvagers.

A dramatic tale of failure and success
The story of the failure of the 1940 Narrows Bridge and the success of the Current Narrows Bridge is a great American saga. When Galloping Gertie splashed into Puget Sound, it created ripple effects across the nation and around the world. The event changed forever how engineers design suspension bridges. Gertie’s failure led to the safer suspension spans we use today.

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I am structural Engineer working in a reputable firm in Los Angeles

Posted in civil engineering, structural engineering, Wind
5 comments on “Collapse of Tacoma Narrow Bridge
  1. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Zeeshan Masood. Zeeshan Masood said: Collapse of Tacoma Narrow Bridge: http://wp.me/pSg6k-a […]

  2. Patti says:

    I grew up in Tacoma and my parents are both photographers. My dad worked at The Camera Shop in downtown Tacoma, and his boss took this video. He sold it to the BBC years ago (before I was born) for a few hundred dollars.

  3. Your site was extremely interesting, especially since I was searching for more info on this just sa few days ago.

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